Rss

Archives for : Health

Scientists ‘delete’ HIV virus from human DNA for the first time

A team at Temple University in Philadelphia used a combination of a DNA-snipping enzyme to eradicate the viral genome from the human cell.

Source: www.dailymail.co.uk

See on Scoop.itCuriosopernatura

From Scourge to Cure: Viruses Versus Cancer

See on Scoop.itCuriosopernatura


Viruses versus cancer. Who’s your money on?

With [oncolytic viruses] OV cancer therapeutics entering advanced-stage trials and showing clinical efficacy, strategies that further broaden OV targeting and replication capacity to address the heterogeneous nature of tumours and their associated vascular and stromal architecture will be extremely useful. Since such heterogeneity not only exists between patients but also within a given tumour/patient, where the metabolism, signal transduction, and antiviral states of cancer cells can be variably abnormal and, therefore, variably support OV replication, combinatorial strategies will be essential to promoting reliable tumour control and regression. Finally, continued efforts to identify components innate to the complex tumour microenvironment that promote OV replication will be critical to further improving OVs and developing new engineering strategies.


See on www.microbiologybytes.com

Flu viruses derive from a global selective sweep in the 1870s

See on Scoop.itCuriosopernatura


A single event seems to have set the stage for all pandemics since.


See on arstechnica.com

Scientists Use 3-D Printer To Help Create Prototype Next-Gen Pacemaker

See on Scoop.itCuriosopernatura

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a new device that may one day help prevent heart attacks.

 

Unlike existing pacemakers and implantable defibrillators that are one-size-fits-all, the new device is a thin, elastic membrane designed to stretch over the heart like a custom-made glove.

 

The new cardiac device — a thin, stretchable membrane imprinted with a spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes — is custom-designed to fit over the heart and contract and expand with it as it beats. 

University of Illinois materials scientist John Rogers co-led the team that invented the new device. He says they used high-resolution imaging, computer modeling, and a 3-D printer to create a plastic model of a heart. Then, they used that as a mold to make a thin, elastic membrane designed to fit snugly over the real heart’s surface.

Rogers compares the silicon version to the heart’s natural membrane, the pericardium. “But this artificial pericardium is instrumented with high quality, man-made devices that can sense and interact with the heart in different ways that are relevant to clinical cardiology,” Rogers said.

Washington University biomedical engineer Igor Efimov helped design and test the new device. He says the membrane’s spider-web-like network of specialized electrodes can continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity and keep it beating at a healthy rate.

“When it senses such a catastrophic event as a heart attack or arrhythmia, it can also apply a high definition therapy,” Efimov said.

 

“So it can apply stimuli, electrical stimuli, from different locations on the device in an optimal fashion to stop this arrhythmia and prevent sudden cardiac death.”

 

Efimov calls the new device a huge advance and hopes it will be approved for use in patients in 10 to 15 years.


See on news.stlpublicradio.org

Giant virus resurrected from 30,000-year-old ice

See on Scoop.itCuriosopernatura


Largest virus yet discovered hints at viral diversity trapped in permafrost.


See on www.nature.com

Comparing Genome Editing Technologies

See on Scoop.itCuriosopernatura


ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas systems help scientists dissect
the vast amount of information accumulated through
the Genomic Revolution.


See on www.genengnews.com

Nanotechnology needle arrays for drug delivery

See on Scoop.itCuriosopernatura

The ultimate goal of nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery, especially with regard to cancer therapy, is to ferry most of the administered drug to the target, while eliminating the accumulation of the drug at any non-target tissues.
Nanomedicine applications with targeted nanoparticles are expected to revolutionize cancer therapy. The use of such nanoparticles to deliver therapeutic agents is currently being studied as a promising method by which drugs can be effectively targeted to specific cells in the body, such as tumor cells.


See on www.nanowerk.com

Scientists Create Genetically Modified Cells That Protect Against HIV

See on Scoop.itCuriosopernatura


The treatment is considered radical, and the results were drawn from a small scale human trial, but for the first time in medical history, researchers have boosted their patients’ ability to fight HIV by replacing some of their natural immune cells with genetically modified versions.


See on io9.com

Top Physician Information Sources by Mobile Device

See on Scoop.itCuriosopernatura

The infographic above illustrates the top physician information sources by frequency of mobile device usage on smartphones/tablets. 

 

source: http://hitconsultant.net/2014/02/20/infographic-top-physician-information-sources-mobile-device/

 


See on hitconsultant.net

SunPower Continues to Drive Down the Cost Curve

I thought you’d be interested in the following article. Click the link to read it in full:

SunPower Continues to Drive Down the Cost Curve
http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/SunPower-Continues-To-Drive-Down-the-Cost-Curve

Inviato da iPhone

%d blogger cliccano Mi Piace per questo: